Concourse Village/Grand Concourse/Morrisania

Bronx

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The Grand Concourse is a prominent thoroughfare bisecting the heart of the Bronx, extending north from East 138th street to Mosholu Parkway and nearby Van Cortlandt Park. It has great accessibility to Manhattan, served by a plethora of subway lines, with Grand Central 25 minutes away. The neighborhood includes the Grand Concourse Historical District, a living museum of stunning and remarkably preserved apartment buildings and houses in the Art Deco, Art Moderne and Tudor styles, landmarked for posterity and extending from 153rd to 167th streets. The magic continues well past the historic district however, with stretches of splendid architecture and landscaping dotting the entire length of the neighborhood. Conceived at the turn-of-the-century, the Grand Concourse was designed as New York City’s larger-scale answer to the Champs-Elysees, and the area developed into a bastion for immingrant families during the early 1900’s.While the Grand Concourse and much of the South Bronx had a decline starting in the 1960’s, it is currently beginning to house a thriving population in transition. The area has received considerable attention from the city and private developers since the mid-1990’s in the form of major landscaping improvements, affordable housing construction, and luxury renovation. Locally energized blight reclamation has successfully yielded two large urban farms that help supply local markets. The result: a steady stream of optimistic individuals and families who have been priced out of Harlem, Brooklyn and other trendy areas, enticed by the very affordable rents and co-op prices. There’s a genuine if somewhat gritty urban bustle transpiring in terms of people and vehicle traffic, shops, markets, grocers, specialty butchers, and a lower-concourse mall near Mill Pond Park hosting large retail stores like Targets and Marshall’s. The Grand Concourse area is worth a trip just for its diverse cultural intensity and architectural delights, however, if you stay long enough to check out the neighborhood and the profusion of parks, museums, statues and stores along the way, you'll see the potential for a stimulating, affordable lifestyle in a unique, revitalized place unlike any other in the city. It includes the Grand Concourse Historical District, a living museum of stunning and remarkably preserved apartment buildings and houses in the Art Deco, Art Moderne and Tudor styles, landmarked for posterity and extending from 153rd to 167th streets. The magic continues well past the historic district however, with stretches of splendid architecture and landscaping dotting the entire length of the road. Conceived at the turn-of-the-century, The Grand Concourse was designed as NYC’s larger-scale answer to the Champs-Elysees, and the area developed into a bastion for upwardly-mobile Jewish and other European emigrant families entering the middle class. By the 1960’s the area began a severe socioeconomic decline, painting the violent, disturbing portrait of neglect, desperation and deprivation known as the South Bronx, notorious in the ‘70s and ‘80s as one of our planet’s most dangerous places. These days the Grand Concourse is once again beginning to house a thriving population in transition. The area has received considerable attention from the city and private developers since the mid-1990’s in the form of major landscaping improvements, affordable housing construction, and luxury renovation. Locally-energized blight reclamation has successfully yielded two large urban farms that help supply local markets. The result: a steady stream of optimistic middle-class folks who’ve been priced out of Harlem, Brooklyn and other hot areas, enticed by the very affordable rents and co-op prices. There’s a genuine if somewhat gritty urban bustle going on in terms of people and vehicle traffic, shops, markets, grocers, specialty butchers, and a lower-concourse mall near Mill Pond Park hosting large retail stores like Targets and Marshall’s. Restaurants and nightlife? Not yet, but sure to follow the money. The Grand Concourse area is worth a trip just for its oozy cultural intensity and vibage, but if you stick around long enough to check out the neighborhood and the profusion of beautiful parks, museums, statues and institutions along the way, you might want to get in on it while it’s still a deal. There’s no other place like it in the city. By Ken Hamberg

Neighborhood Highlights

Buses:

Bx6
Bx11
Bx15
Bx21
Bx35
Bx41

Rental Prices:

$667 ― $1,400

Sales Prices:

$160,000 ― $334,000

Landmarks:

N/A

School Districts:

9

Police Precincts:

42

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