East Harlem

Manhattan

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"The East Harlem neighborhood has seldom been known by its geographic constraints but always by its ethnicity. The chunk of Manhattan Island at the confluence of the Harlem and East rivers north of 96th Street and east of 5th Avenue spent much of its life as farmland until the arrival of the Lexington Avenue subway after World War I. Italians and Sicilians were the first groups to arrive en masse and the neighborhood was christened Italian Harlem. New York's most famous mayor, Fiorello La Guardia, hailed from East Harlem. The next wave of migration brought Latinos and the neighborhood's more famous moniker - Spanish Harlem. Urban renewal gave East Harlem the second highest concentration of public housing in America. The community has undergone gentrification in recent years but remains solidly working class with affordable New York City rents to be found in some reconfigured properties. Several highly regarded charter schools have set up shop in East Harlem. While increasingly diverse, the population remains one-third Hispanic which means great Central American and South American food at easy-to-swallow prices in the restaurants along 5th Avenue. Rao's Italian restaurant on East 114th Street has been a neighborhood institution since 1896 and a true bastion of southern Neopolitan Italian dining. The north half of New York's Museum Mile that begins at the Metropolitan Museum of Art marches into East Harlem and features such standouts as the Museum of the City of New York and El Museo del Barrio. The Lexington Avenue Line, serviced by the 4, 5 and 6 trains, has five stops in East Harlem before reaching its terminus at 125th Street." By: Doug Gelbert

Neighborhood Highlights

Trains:

4
6
5

Buses:

Bx15
M15
M35
M98
M101
M102
M106
M116

Rental Prices:

$1,400 ― $2,200

Sales Prices:

$342,000 ― $516,000

Landmarks:

Shubert Theatre, Harlem Meer, El Museo del Barrio

School Districts:

4

Police Precincts:

25

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