Neighborhoods Tagged as: Affordable

Click here to see Blog Posts tagged as: Affordable
  • (Manhattan)

    Manhattan’s Chinatown is a thriving ethnic district, home to many generations of Chinese and Chinese American families as well as plenty of residents without Chinese heritage, but an appreciation for the neighborhood. While Chinatown is bustling in the daytime, most neighborhood establishments close by 9 p.m., fairly early by New York standards, making it a quiet residential area. Chinatown, a warren of little, winding streets, is bounded by Broadway on the West, Rutgers and Essex Streets on the East, Madison and Worth Streets on the South and Broome, Grand and Canal Streets on the North....

  • (Manhattan)

    "The East Harlem neighborhood has seldom been known by its geographic constraints but always by its ethnicity. The chunk of Manhattan Island at the confluence of the Harlem and East rivers north of 96th Street and east of 5th Avenue spent much of its life as farmland until the arrival of the Lexington Avenue subway after World War I. Italians and Sicilians were the first groups to arrive en masse and the neighborhood was christened Italian Harlem. New York's most famous mayor, Fiorello La Guardia, hailed from East Harlem. The next wave of migration brought Latinos and the neighborhood's more...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Once known as the Bloomingdale Tract for the verdant farm that occupied the area after the Civil War, Manhattan Valley has undergone a series of transformations, none as remarkable as the one in progress right now. The neighborhood, which runs from Broadway to Central Park West and from 96th to 110th , has been recently renamed and reclaimed. Known as “Shanty Town” at the turn of the century for the Irish who came to escape the crowded conditions on the Lower East Side, Manhattan Valley has seen its share of crime and grime. Drug-riddled and rat-infested through most of the 1950s and...

  • (Manhattan)

    Just above the Upper West Side’s Manhattan Valley and just below Harlem sits Manhattan’s college town: Morningside Heights (though don’t expect any football fields, the sports complex of Morningside’s major university is up in Inwood). Running above 103rd Street through 125th street, from Riverside Drive at the west and Morningside Drive on the east, the neighborhood is also bordered by Riverside Park and Morningside Park, making it a nice oasis of green spaces. The neighborhood is probably best known for housing Columbia University. The campus at 116th St and Broadway takes up s...

  • (Manhattan)

    Once known for its prisons and asylums, Roosevelt Island – an oasis of public parks and river views – provides the feel of suburban living via a five-minute tram ride from Manhattan. Located between Manhattan’s Upper East Side and the borough of Queens, the island attracts a diverse group of people from an ethnic, economic and social standpoint. Young professionals, families, United Nations workers, senior citizens and college students all call Roosevelt Island home. The two-mile long island offers an affordable mix of older low-rise apartment buildings and recently developed high ris...

  • (Manhattan)

    "One of the most affordable areas of New York City is also one of its highest physical points. Flanked by the Hudson and Harlem Rivers, Washington Heights (‘The Heights’) begins at west 155th and stretches up to Dykman Street. A bustling terraced town of 5ish story apartment buildings, house rows, and co-ops that inspired the Broadway show In the Heights, Washington Heights breathes gentrification in motion. The Spanish-infused lyrics and rocking salsa/hip-hop score of the show invokes the bilingual nature of its immigrant population, with splashes accommodating the rich reality of ethnic...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Bay Ridge Far in the Southwestern oceanic outskirts of Brooklyn lies Bay Ridge, what many Brooklynites and even Manhattan dwellers are calling the next big neighborhood. Why? Well, partially thanks to low rent prices, as the area is about an hour out of Manhattan. Only accessible by R train, the lack of transportation options is one major drawback to living here. Or, accept the lower rent prices and take more car services. A Business Insider article from June 2014 entitled “NYC Real Estate Has Gotten So Hot That Stockbrokers, Hipsters, And Yuppies Are Invading The Far Reaches Of Brookly...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Bedford-Stuyvesant is a central Brooklyn neighborhood with a rich history and a lot of character. Recent years have brought a huge influx of gentrification to the area, which many blame on rising Manhattan rents forcing middle class New Yorkers to move to neighborhoods previously deemed less desirable. A predominantly African American neighborhood, the surge of “yuppies” moving into the neighborhood has been criticized by many who want to retain Bed-Stuy’s identity. Bed-Stuy stretches from Flushing Avene on the north (bordering Williamsburg) to Classon Avenue on the west (Clinton...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Borough Park is a Brooklyn neighborhood in the Southwest section of the borough. On the smaller side, the neighborhood spans from Ninth Avenue to McDonald Avenue and is one of the mostly densely populated areas of Brooklyn. Home to the most concentrated population of Orthodox Jews outside of Israel, the neighborhood is full of places of worship, kosher restaurants and supermarkets. Large celebrations like Sukkot and Purim are perfect showcases of the festivity and closeness of the community. The neighborhood is only two square miles, resulting in a very tightly knit population of families that...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Namesake of Neil Simon’s hilarious coming-of-age play, location site for TV shows like Law & Order and Russian Dolls and known far and wide as “Little Odessa” for its huge Russian population, Brighton Beach is not your typical New York City neighborhood. Surrounded on three sides by sandy shores and neighbor to the legendary amusement haven of Coney Island, it’s hard to imagine Brooklyn’s Brighton Beach as a thrumming center of one of the largest urban cities in the United States. Developed in the mid-1800s in an attempt to mimic the resort of Brighton in England, Brighton Beach was...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "If one definition of a neighborhood ""arriving"" is its discovery by national chain stores, Bushwick is still decidedly in the ""up and coming"" camp. Bushwick was its own independent town for 200 years before casting its lot with Brooklyn in 1854. The town was cleaved into the neighborhoods of Williamsburg, Greenpoint and Bushwick. So many Germans settled here in the 1800s that the brewing industry was the economic foundation of the community. In 1904 44 breweries were keeping the borough awash in Bavarian Pilsner beer. In those days, Bushwick was a working class neighborhood with spotles...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Canarsie is a neighborhood in the southeastern portion of the borough of Brooklyn, in New York City, United States. The area is part of Brooklyn Community Board 18. Canarsie, which includes the entire 11236 ZIP code, is bordered on the east by Fresh Creek Basin, East 108th Street, and the BMT Canarsie Line (L train) to Linden Boulevard; on the north by Linden Boulevard; on the west by Remsen Avenue to Ralph Avenue and the Paerdegat Basin; and on the south by Jamaica Bay. Canarsie also neighbors East Flatbush, Flatlands, Mill Basin, Bergen Beach, and East New York. Canarsie is patrolled by the...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Crown Heights, a predominantly Caribbean and Hasidic Jewish neighborhood, is an up-and-coming area (read: quickly gentrifying), attracting a diverse group of young professionals and artists. Authentic Caribbean restaurants dot the streets and some small trendy bars and restaurants have opened, such as Franklin Park beer garden, which draws a mixed crowd from all over the ‘hood. Franklin Street is a main area for shopping and dining, home to the new Berg’n, a beer hall and gourmet food court (think ramen burgers and wood-fired pizza), which will also be the indoor home to Brooklyn Flea t...

  • (Brooklyn)

    To some native New Yorkers, the name “East New York” does not have the most positive connotation based on issues of the past. The East New York of today is a resurging neighborhood on the forefront of affordable housing, private and public. Sitting at the northeast corner of Brooklyn, East New York has become an integral part of New York City’s goal of creating neighborhoods that are affordable, safe, and accessible via public transit. Residential streets are lined with low-rise town homes, single-family houses, and mid-rise apartment buildings, while major thoroughfares provide a pletho...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Flatlands is a neighborhood in the southwest area of Brooklyn, bounded by Avenue H to the north, Avenue U to the south, Ralph Avenue to the east, Flatbush Avenue to the southwest and Nostrand Avenue to the northwest. The flat land of Flatlands was initially settled as a farming area, for tobacco and vegetables, and has gone through several major changes in its demographics over the years. It has consistently maintained an family-friendly atmosphere that keeps the neighborhood safe. The seclusion of the area makes it seem almost suburban it its tranquility, but shoppers do have easy access to...