Neighborhoods Tagged as: Art Galleries

  • (Manhattan)

    Home to NYC’s contemporary art scene, Chelsea‘s streets are lined with galleries, studios and trendy apartments. Spanning below 28th Street and above 14th Street, from Broadway to the Hudson River, Chelsea changes character even within its boundaries. To the far west is the High Line, the elevated park that attracts plenty of neighborhood locals as well as tourists. Look towards 23rd street for the prominent Chelsea galleries, like Barbara Gladstone and the Gagosian. Pop into galleries on Thursday evenings for openings that often include free wine and even “meet and greets” with the...

  • (Manhattan)

    "The Manhattan neighborhood takes it name from one of the world's most recognizable buildings, the wedge-shaped masterpiece designed by Daniel Burnham that dominated the New York City skyline when the early skyscraper was completed in 1902. While the footprint of the building resembles an antique cast-iron clothes iron, the surrounding neighborhood is a compact rectangle centered around Madison Square Park. The blocks north of Union Square, east of Chelsea and west of Gramercy Park weren't even a residential neighborhood until the 1980s when legacy clothing and toy factories began makeovers...

  • (Manhattan)

    "The Lower East Side’s rich immigrant history has made it a truly dynamic place to be for centuries! Currently popular with creatives and young professionals, the Lower East Side (LES) was previously inhabited by Italian immigrants who eventually moved north to Little Italy, Chinese immigrants who moved west to Chinatown and Eastern European Jewish immigrants who moved across the river to Williamsburg. But remnants of these ethnic enclaves are all over the neighborhood. Stretching below Delancey Street and down towards Grand Street, from the East River to Broadway, the Lower East Si...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "Although the family of Dutch homesteaders, the Boerums, owned most of the land where this neighborhood in northwest Brooklyn existed in colonial times, today, the name ""Boerum Hill"" is more of a marketing slogan than a historical designation. It was created to rebrand North Gowanus when gentrification swept through in the 1970s. The marshland along the Gowanus Creek grew as a working class enclave and, by the end of the 19th century the streets were lined with three-bay, three-story Greek Revival and Italianate brick townhouses set comfortably behind stone stoops. Where once ironworkers re...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Over recent years, artists, techies, and families with children have become attracted to the Dumbo and Vinegar Hill sections of Brooklyn. Dumbo, an acronym for “Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass”, covers the area between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges and east of the Manhattan Bridge to Vinegar Hill. Vinegar Hill stretches from Front Street to the East River waterfront and from Bridge Street to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The neighborhood offers a nice array of townhouses, walk-up apartment buildings and high rises, comingled with notable culinary establishments such as Grimaldiâ...

  • (Manhattan)

    SoHo is an area in Lower Manhattan that is as much a state-of-mind as it is a locale. SoHo is bounded by Houston and Canal streets to the north and south, and by Crosby Street and Avenue of the Americas to the east and west. Most of the streets in central SoHo are rather narrow and paved with Belgian blocks, a sort of half-brick, half cobblestone, and you can go many blocks south, in the shadow of the Freedom Tower, without seeing a tree. It’s an evocative experience, and it’s easy to imagine horses and wagons crowding these streets in another era. SoHo is probably the world’s capital...