Neighborhoods Tagged as: Family-Friendly

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  • (Manhattan)

    Carnegie Hill is an area in Manhattan’s Upper East Side extending from 86th to 96th Streets, south to north and flanked by Fifth and Third Avenues, west to east. Named for the industrial magnate and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, who built himself an uptown mansion there, Carnegie Hill is indeed hilly, unique and somewhat remote from the noise and frantic pace of the rest of the island. Carnegie Hill divides in character and texture at Lexington Avenue. Moving west along the cool, placid streets lush with shady foliage, you enter a world of timeless privilege and incalculable wealth. F...

  • (Manhattan)

    Manhattan’s Chinatown is a thriving ethnic district, home to many generations of Chinese and Chinese American families as well as plenty of residents without Chinese heritage, but an appreciation for the neighborhood. While Chinatown is bustling in the daytime, most neighborhood establishments close by 9 p.m., fairly early by New York standards, making it a quiet residential area. Chinatown, a warren of little, winding streets, is bounded by Broadway on the West, Rutgers and Essex Streets on the East, Madison and Worth Streets on the South and Broome, Grand and Canal Streets on the North....

  • (Manhattan)

    Although the Financial District of NYC is immediately associated with Wall Street, the stock market and investment bankers, the neighborhood at the southern tip of Manhattan is better recognized historically as the original settlement of New York City. This is where the arriving Dutch settlers under Peter Stuyvesant built their homes; Wall Street was the location of an actual defensive wall, constructed across the northern edge of the village. This neighborhood is so old the streets still have names and not numbers on the NYC street grid. The concrete canyons of the Financial District contain...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Most New York City neighborhoods contain historic landmarks, in Gramercy Park the neighborhood is the landmark. Early New York developer Samuel Ruggles reclaimed part of a swamp (""Gramercy"" is the mashing up of Dutch words meaning ""little crooked swamp"") to create Manhattan's only private park in 1831. The urban oasis between East 20th and East 21st Streets and Park Avenue and Third Avenue was fenced in a few years later and the four wrought iron gates have been locked since 1844. Once a year, often on the first Sunday in May, the gates of New York's most exclusive private park swing open...

  • (Manhattan)

    "The East Harlem neighborhood has seldom been known by its geographic constraints but always by its ethnicity. The chunk of Manhattan Island at the confluence of the Harlem and East rivers north of 96th Street and east of 5th Avenue spent much of its life as farmland until the arrival of the Lexington Avenue subway after World War I. Italians and Sicilians were the first groups to arrive en masse and the neighborhood was christened Italian Harlem. New York's most famous mayor, Fiorello La Guardia, hailed from East Harlem. The next wave of migration brought Latinos and the neighborhood's more...

  • (Manhattan)

    "A distinct entity with winding roads, hilly rises, and nearly detached road gridding, Inwood is nearly surrounded by water. Not to be confused with the similar Inwood of Nassau County, the tiptop neighborhood of the island Manhattan is bordered by the Harlem River in the North and East, the Hudson to the West, and the land touching down in Fort Tryon Park and Dyckman. Water and nature pervade the edges and the inner neighborhood, creating a suburban ‘au natural’ feel with an insistently beating city heart. Residentially, older five-eight story prewar apartment buildings dominate the lands...

  • (Manhattan)

    Kips Bay is an interesting area in Manhattan, extending from 23rd Street north to 34th Street and bordering on the Gramercy and Murray Hill sections, respectively. It’s equal parts diverse residential neighborhood and seemingly endless medical complex. Kips Bay’s eastern boundary, extending west to Third Avenue is the mighty East River, where you’ll find Waterside Plaza with it’s vaguely Soviet futuristic architecture and stunning open river views, and the United Nations International School (UNIS), one of the city’s finer and more progressive private schools. First Avenue in Kips...

  • (Manhattan)

    The plan to create the world's largest performing arts complex was so audacious in 1959 that President Dwight David Eisenhower was summoned from Washington to turn the first shovel of dirt near the intersection of Broadway and 64th Street. In the half-century since ground was broken Lincoln Center has come to embrace 30 indoor and outdoor performance facilities. The neighborhood that grew up around the "great cultural adventure" is compact, embracing the blocks between West 59th and West 72nd streets from the southwest side of Central Park to the Hudson River. This was farmland until the open...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Once known as the Bloomingdale Tract for the verdant farm that occupied the area after the Civil War, Manhattan Valley has undergone a series of transformations, none as remarkable as the one in progress right now. The neighborhood, which runs from Broadway to Central Park West and from 96th to 110th , has been recently renamed and reclaimed. Known as “Shanty Town” at the turn of the century for the Irish who came to escape the crowded conditions on the Lower East Side, Manhattan Valley has seen its share of crime and grime. Drug-riddled and rat-infested through most of the 1950s and...

  • (Manhattan)

    Just above the Upper West Side’s Manhattan Valley and just below Harlem sits Manhattan’s college town: Morningside Heights (though don’t expect any football fields, the sports complex of Morningside’s major university is up in Inwood). Running above 103rd Street through 125th street, from Riverside Drive at the west and Morningside Drive on the east, the neighborhood is also bordered by Riverside Park and Morningside Park, making it a nice oasis of green spaces. The neighborhood is probably best known for housing Columbia University. The campus at 116th St and Broadway takes up s...

  • (Manhattan)

    New Yorkers glance at Murray Hill, the swath of Manhattan from 27th to 40th Streets between Fifth Avenue and the East River, as they leave the City via the Midtown Tunnel. Once the home turf of stewardesses, traveling salesman and single career gals working in the Garment Center, sleepy Murray Hill has molted its past, revealing itself to be a liveable and surprisingly lively neighborhood worth a second glance. Old-timers in the neighborhood have been joined by doctors and diplomats, families, and new crop of early career singles. The mix of townhouses, co-ops and high-rise apartments tends...

  • (Manhattan)

    Once known for its prisons and asylums, Roosevelt Island – an oasis of public parks and river views – provides the feel of suburban living via a five-minute tram ride from Manhattan. Located between Manhattan’s Upper East Side and the borough of Queens, the island attracts a diverse group of people from an ethnic, economic and social standpoint. Young professionals, families, United Nations workers, senior citizens and college students all call Roosevelt Island home. The two-mile long island offers an affordable mix of older low-rise apartment buildings and recently developed high ris...

  • (Manhattan)

    Thinking about living on the Upper East Side of NYC? Framed by Central Park to the west, the East River to the East, and 59th and 96th streets south and north respectively, the Upper East Side (UES) of NYC provides residents and visitors alike with world-class boutiques such as Barneys New York alongside top restaurants and globally recognized museums. The neighborhood’s “Museum Mile” (5th Avenue between East 82nd and 105th streets) features nine renowned museums with favorites such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Museum. Walk a few blocks east and travel up and d...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Culture vultures, runners, therapists and foodies have long been drawn to the family-friendly, tree-lined streets of the Upper West Side (UWS). The neighborhood that stretches from 59th to 110th Street and from Central Park West to the Hudson River offers people with a penchant for pre-war buildings and charming brownstones treasures as varied as the Museum of Natural History, Gray’s Papaya, Lincoln Center, Zabar’s, and the flagship Fairway Market There are multiple dog runs and bike paths in the neighborhood’s parks as well as an array of first-rate restaurants, boutiques, supermark...

  • (Manhattan)

    "One of the most affordable areas of New York City is also one of its highest physical points. Flanked by the Hudson and Harlem Rivers, Washington Heights (‘The Heights’) begins at west 155th and stretches up to Dykman Street. A bustling terraced town of 5ish story apartment buildings, house rows, and co-ops that inspired the Broadway show In the Heights, Washington Heights breathes gentrification in motion. The Spanish-infused lyrics and rocking salsa/hip-hop score of the show invokes the bilingual nature of its immigrant population, with splashes accommodating the rich reality of ethnic...