Neighborhoods Tagged as: Family-Friendly

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  • (Brooklyn)

    Bay Ridge Far in the Southwestern oceanic outskirts of Brooklyn lies Bay Ridge, what many Brooklynites and even Manhattan dwellers are calling the next big neighborhood. Why? Well, partially thanks to low rent prices, as the area is about an hour out of Manhattan. Only accessible by R train, the lack of transportation options is one major drawback to living here. Or, accept the lower rent prices and take more car services. A Business Insider article from June 2014 entitled “NYC Real Estate Has Gotten So Hot That Stockbrokers, Hipsters, And Yuppies Are Invading The Far Reaches Of Brookly...

  • (Brooklyn)

    If you’re thinking back to old school Brooklyn, Bensonhurst is the place to be. Bensonhurst -- one of the neighborhoods further from Manhattan to still resist gentrification -- is home to clusters of family-owned businesses, local restaurants and generations of Brooklynite residents. The neighborhood is known for having heavy populations of Italian Americans and Jewish Americans as well as a slew of new immigrants, many from Asia, specifically China. Bensonhurst’s borders are slightly controversial, yet you’ll find the neighborhood ending at Bay Parkway and Stillwell Avenue, close to...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "Although the family of Dutch homesteaders, the Boerums, owned most of the land where this neighborhood in northwest Brooklyn existed in colonial times, today, the name ""Boerum Hill"" is more of a marketing slogan than a historical designation. It was created to rebrand North Gowanus when gentrification swept through in the 1970s. The marshland along the Gowanus Creek grew as a working class enclave and, by the end of the 19th century the streets were lined with three-bay, three-story Greek Revival and Italianate brick townhouses set comfortably behind stone stoops. Where once ironworkers re...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Borough Park is a Brooklyn neighborhood in the Southwest section of the borough. On the smaller side, the neighborhood spans from Ninth Avenue to McDonald Avenue and is one of the mostly densely populated areas of Brooklyn. Home to the most concentrated population of Orthodox Jews outside of Israel, the neighborhood is full of places of worship, kosher restaurants and supermarkets. Large celebrations like Sukkot and Purim are perfect showcases of the festivity and closeness of the community. The neighborhood is only two square miles, resulting in a very tightly knit population of families that...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Namesake of Neil Simon’s hilarious coming-of-age play, location site for TV shows like Law & Order and Russian Dolls and known far and wide as “Little Odessa” for its huge Russian population, Brighton Beach is not your typical New York City neighborhood. Surrounded on three sides by sandy shores and neighbor to the legendary amusement haven of Coney Island, it’s hard to imagine Brooklyn’s Brighton Beach as a thrumming center of one of the largest urban cities in the United States. Developed in the mid-1800s in an attempt to mimic the resort of Brighton in England, Brighton Beach was...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "If one definition of a neighborhood ""arriving"" is its discovery by national chain stores, Bushwick is still decidedly in the ""up and coming"" camp. Bushwick was its own independent town for 200 years before casting its lot with Brooklyn in 1854. The town was cleaved into the neighborhoods of Williamsburg, Greenpoint and Bushwick. So many Germans settled here in the 1800s that the brewing industry was the economic foundation of the community. In 1904 44 breweries were keeping the borough awash in Bavarian Pilsner beer. In those days, Bushwick was a working class neighborhood with spotles...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Canarsie is a neighborhood in the southeastern portion of the borough of Brooklyn, in New York City, United States. The area is part of Brooklyn Community Board 18. Canarsie, which includes the entire 11236 ZIP code, is bordered on the east by Fresh Creek Basin, East 108th Street, and the BMT Canarsie Line (L train) to Linden Boulevard; on the north by Linden Boulevard; on the west by Remsen Avenue to Ralph Avenue and the Paerdegat Basin; and on the south by Jamaica Bay. Canarsie also neighbors East Flatbush, Flatlands, Mill Basin, Bergen Beach, and East New York. Canarsie is patrolled by the...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Carroll Gardens is a neighborhood that encompasses a large part of Northern Brooklyn. The boundaries are the Brooklyn Queens Expressway to the east, the Gowanus Expressway to the south, DeGraw street to the north, and the Gowanus Canal to the west. A formerly Italian enclave, the neighborhood has recently gained popularity as a hip place for young people who many have been priced out of nearby Park Slope. One of the draws of Carroll Gardens are the large front gardens many of the beautiful townhouses feature. The neighborhood has many breathtakingly beautiful streets; President Street typifies...

  • (Brooklyn)

    One of Brooklyn’s most charming neighborhoods is Cobble Hill! Located close to Boerum Hill and Carroll Gardens, the entire region has gotten the recent nickname of BoCoCa, though the three areas are distinct. Cobble Hill runs from Degraw St. and Atlantic Ave., between Court St. and Hicks St. Though small, the neighborhood is packed with charming brownstones and plenty of attractive boutiques, restaurants and bars. La Vara (www.lavarany.com) is one of Brooklyn’s few Michelin-starred eateries, serving exquisite tapas with Moorish and Jewish influences. Atlantic Avenue’s Colonie serves...

  • (Brooklyn)

    At the very end of Brooklyn, right on the Atlantic Ocean, is a neighborhood perhaps best known for its diversions: Coney Island. Home to a historic boardwalk as well as Luna Park, which opened as New York’s first amusement park in 1903, Coney Island is a prime destination for local tourists during the warmer months. Riding The Cyclone, a large wooden roller coaster often associated with the theme park, is a Brooklyn rite of passage for some, just as eating a Nathan’s hot dog near the boardwalk is for others. In addition to beaches and roller coasters, Coney Island is also a large...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Crown Heights, a predominantly Caribbean and Hasidic Jewish neighborhood, is an up-and-coming area (read: quickly gentrifying), attracting a diverse group of young professionals and artists. Authentic Caribbean restaurants dot the streets and some small trendy bars and restaurants have opened, such as Franklin Park beer garden, which draws a mixed crowd from all over the ‘hood. Franklin Street is a main area for shopping and dining, home to the new Berg’n, a beer hall and gourmet food court (think ramen burgers and wood-fired pizza), which will also be the indoor home to Brooklyn Flea t...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Over recent years, artists, techies, and families with children have become attracted to the Dumbo and Vinegar Hill sections of Brooklyn. Dumbo, an acronym for “Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass”, covers the area between the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges and east of the Manhattan Bridge to Vinegar Hill. Vinegar Hill stretches from Front Street to the East River waterfront and from Bridge Street to the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The neighborhood offers a nice array of townhouses, walk-up apartment buildings and high rises, comingled with notable culinary establishments such as Grimaldiâ...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Flatbush is like an appetizer plate: stepping onto its strip mall central avenues one finds the smells and tastes of Caribbean, Chinese, and Mexican food stores mirrored by Asian and Jewish restaurant styles galore ripe for dipping. The neighborhood is a prime example of Brooklyn dynamism in action with a tumultuous mix of working and middle class residents. Food and living spaces are equally versatile, with apartment buildings mixing it up between older rowed houses, Victorian-style, and brownstones. It isn’t uncommon to find individual family housing inside or outside of apartment building...

  • (Brooklyn)

    To some native New Yorkers, the name “East New York” does not have the most positive connotation based on issues of the past. The East New York of today is a resurging neighborhood on the forefront of affordable housing, private and public. Sitting at the northeast corner of Brooklyn, East New York has become an integral part of New York City’s goal of creating neighborhoods that are affordable, safe, and accessible via public transit. Residential streets are lined with low-rise town homes, single-family houses, and mid-rise apartment buildings, while major thoroughfares provide a pletho...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Flatlands is a neighborhood in the southwest area of Brooklyn, bounded by Avenue H to the north, Avenue U to the south, Ralph Avenue to the east, Flatbush Avenue to the southwest and Nostrand Avenue to the northwest. The flat land of Flatlands was initially settled as a farming area, for tobacco and vegetables, and has gone through several major changes in its demographics over the years. It has consistently maintained an family-friendly atmosphere that keeps the neighborhood safe. The seclusion of the area makes it seem almost suburban it its tranquility, but shoppers do have easy access to...