Neighborhoods Tagged as: Great Schools

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  • (Manhattan)

    Carnegie Hill is an area in Manhattan’s Upper East Side extending from 86th to 96th Streets, south to north and flanked by Fifth and Third Avenues, west to east. Named for the industrial magnate and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, who built himself an uptown mansion there, Carnegie Hill is indeed hilly, unique and somewhat remote from the noise and frantic pace of the rest of the island. Carnegie Hill divides in character and texture at Lexington Avenue. Moving west along the cool, placid streets lush with shady foliage, you enter a world of timeless privilege and incalculable wealth. F...

  • (Manhattan)

    The plan to create the world's largest performing arts complex was so audacious in 1959 that President Dwight David Eisenhower was summoned from Washington to turn the first shovel of dirt near the intersection of Broadway and 64th Street. In the half-century since ground was broken Lincoln Center has come to embrace 30 indoor and outdoor performance facilities. The neighborhood that grew up around the "great cultural adventure" is compact, embracing the blocks between West 59th and West 72nd streets from the southwest side of Central Park to the Hudson River. This was farmland until the open...

  • (Manhattan)

    Less than 50 years ago, TriBeCa, “the triangle below Canal St.,” was an industrial wasteland where starving artists squatted in abandoned warehouses. Today, it’s considered by many to be one of the most desirable neighborhoods in NYC. Stretching from Canal St. (bordering SoHo) south to Vesey St. (abutting the Financial District) and from Broadway west to the Hudson River, Tribeca boasts cobblestoned streets, waterfront views, fabled restaurants, trendy bars and world-class shopping. Its historic warehouses have been painstakingly converted to multi-million-dollar lofts and luxury apart...

  • (Manhattan)

    Thinking about living on the Upper East Side of NYC? Framed by Central Park to the west, the East River to the East, and 59th and 96th streets south and north respectively, the Upper East Side (UES) of NYC provides residents and visitors alike with world-class boutiques such as Barneys New York alongside top restaurants and globally recognized museums. The neighborhood’s “Museum Mile” (5th Avenue between East 82nd and 105th streets) features nine renowned museums with favorites such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Museum. Walk a few blocks east and travel up and d...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Culture vultures, runners, therapists and foodies have long been drawn to the family-friendly, tree-lined streets of the Upper West Side (UWS). The neighborhood that stretches from 59th to 110th Street and from Central Park West to the Hudson River offers people with a penchant for pre-war buildings and charming brownstones treasures as varied as the Museum of Natural History, Gray’s Papaya, Lincoln Center, Zabar’s, and the flagship Fairway Market There are multiple dog runs and bike paths in the neighborhood’s parks as well as an array of first-rate restaurants, boutiques, supermark...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "Although the family of Dutch homesteaders, the Boerums, owned most of the land where this neighborhood in northwest Brooklyn existed in colonial times, today, the name ""Boerum Hill"" is more of a marketing slogan than a historical designation. It was created to rebrand North Gowanus when gentrification swept through in the 1970s. The marshland along the Gowanus Creek grew as a working class enclave and, by the end of the 19th century the streets were lined with three-bay, three-story Greek Revival and Italianate brick townhouses set comfortably behind stone stoops. Where once ironworkers re...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "Brooklyn Heights is a residential area in Brooklyn, a genteel pocket of affluence, optimism, tranquility and atmosphere – there’s a definite vibe here, and a pleasant one at that. Brooklyn Heights extends from Old Fulton Street and the entrance to the Brooklyn Bridge at the north and flows south to the bustle of Atlantic Avenue. It’s bounded by the East River and Cadman Plaza going west to east. It’s an old and historical place, and was the first neighborhood protected by the local Landmarks Preservation Law. A good deal of the charm of the area comes from the presence of literally hu...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Midwood is a Brooklyn neighborhood in the central southern area of the borough. It is bounded on the north by the Brooklyn College campus and on the south by Avenue P. The eastern border is Nostrand Avenue, McDonald Avenue to the west is the other boundary. The ‘hood has seen several demographic changes throughout its history, and most recently the neighborhood has become a destination for Orthodox Jews from other parts of Brooklyn. In fact, the 2012 census found Midwood to be the least diverse neighborhood in otherwise extremely diverse New York! Midwood has remained a steadily quiet and...

  • (Queens)

    Glen Oaks is a neighborhood in the easternmost portion of the New York City Borough of Queens. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 13. Glen Oaks lies between Grand Central Parkway to the north, Union Turnpike to the south, the Queens/Nassau county border (Lakeville Road) to the east, and the Cross Island Parkway to the west. In this area, the Queens/Nassau border separates New York City from the Village of Lake Success. The Queens/Nassau border is referred to locally as \"the city line\" and is so designated on New York City buses. Union Turnpike is the main commercial road in t...

  • (Queens)

    Little Neck is a neighborhood of Queens, New York City, bordered on the north by Little Neck Bay and on the east by Great Neck in Nassau County. Due to this proximity to Nassau, Little Neck remains one of the most suburban feeling areas in New York City. The southern border is the Grand Central Parkway, and to the west is Douglaston. The Little Neck station is the easternmost New York City station on the Port Washington Branch of the Long Island Rail Road (LIRR). The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 11.

  • (Bronx)

    "Looking for a quaint suburban neighborhood within a private community in NYC? Then Fieldston is an area to consider. A small, leafy enclave within the Riverdale neighborhood of the Bronx, Fieldston captures the bucolic charm of a Westchester neighborhood without having to leave the city proper. Bound by the Henry Hudson Parkway to the north and west, Broadway to the east, and Waldo Avenue/Manhattan College Parkway to the south, the neighborhood provides a great backdrop for large, upscale homes with well-sized lots and beautiful tree-lined streets. The area is managed by the Fieldston Propert...

  • (Bronx)

    Riverdale is an affluent residential neighborhood in the northwest portion of the Bronx in New York City. Early in its residential development, Riverdale was a 19th-century estate district where many of Manhattan's moguls built their country estates. At the turn of the century, the new popularity of railroad commute enabled wealthy businessmen to make Riverdale their year-round residence. The Fieldston neighborhood, owned by a private association, is a particularly intact example of a turn-of-the century upper class suburb. The Hudson Hill neighborhood retains many of its historic mansions. R...

  • (Staten Island)

    Arden Heights is a name increasingly applied to the western part of Annadale, a neighborhood located on the South Shore of Staten Island, New York, USA. The name "Arden Heights" is found on most maps of New York City. Long noted for being the site of St. Michael's Home For Children, a Roman Catholic orphanage, Arden Heights underwent a serious transformation when Village Greens, New York City's first planned urban development, opened there in 1971.

  • (Staten Island)

    Grant City is the name of a neighborhood located on the East Shore of Staten Island. Originally known as Frenchtown, the community was renamed in honor of Civil War General Ulysses S. Grant soon after the conflict began, despite the fact that the war itself was so unpopular on Staten Island that the island was the scene of anti-draft riots in July 1863. Many of the streets are named after historical figures such as Lincoln Ave (after President Abraham Lincoln) and Greeley Ave (after newspaper editor Horace Greeley). Many other streets were originally named after historical figures but those st...

  • (Staten Island)

    Willowbrook is a neighborhood in Staten Island. Willowbrook once lay at the heart of the island's agricultural zone, and first saw other significant development when a military hospital opened there during World War II. The neighborhood was also drastically transformed with the opening of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in November 1964. Soon after this, the farms were sold and broken up, and residential housing was built on the property. Many of the owners of the newly built homes were Jewish families, and as a result, Willowbrook became the center of the island's Orthodox Jewish community.