Neighborhoods Tagged as: Great Transit

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  • (Manhattan)

    Battery Park City is its own little narrow enclave, Manhattan’s secret retreat. Coming from the East (your only choice unless you arrive by ferry) you cross West Street – or the West Side Highway –heightening the feeling that you’re kind of leaving the rest of Manhattan behind. Stretching from Chambers Street in the north, to Battery Place in the south, BOC includes a dozen micro-environments, from waterfront parks, sunbathing meadows, ponds, and playgrounds, to restaurants, shopping, movies, and museums. Built on landfill from the first World Trade Center, it’s a neighborhood of...

  • (Manhattan)

    Carnegie Hill is an area in Manhattan’s Upper East Side extending from 86th to 96th Streets, south to north and flanked by Fifth and Third Avenues, west to east. Named for the industrial magnate and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, who built himself an uptown mansion there, Carnegie Hill is indeed hilly, unique and somewhat remote from the noise and frantic pace of the rest of the island. Carnegie Hill divides in character and texture at Lexington Avenue. Moving west along the cool, placid streets lush with shady foliage, you enter a world of timeless privilege and incalculable wealth. F...

  • (Manhattan)

    Home to NYC’s contemporary art scene, Chelsea‘s streets are lined with galleries, studios and trendy apartments. Spanning below 28th Street and above 14th Street, from Broadway to the Hudson River, Chelsea changes character even within its boundaries. To the far west is the High Line, the elevated park that attracts plenty of neighborhood locals as well as tourists. Look towards 23rd street for the prominent Chelsea galleries, like Barbara Gladstone and the Gagosian. Pop into galleries on Thursday evenings for openings that often include free wine and even “meet and greets” with the...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Known as a physical extension of the NYU campus, the East Village has transformed from its once-gritty reputation into a cleaner, more hip (and gentrified), lively neighborhood where the action never stops. Twenty-somethings are the dominant group of residents, but the neighborhood has its breadth of diversity, like any area of New York City. Bordered below 14th Street, above Houston Street, and anything east of Broadway, even within the boundaries of the East Village you’ll find various subcultures and pockets of culture. Avenues A, B, C, and D are known as Alphabet City, a once popu...

  • (Manhattan)

    Although the Financial District of NYC is immediately associated with Wall Street, the stock market and investment bankers, the neighborhood at the southern tip of Manhattan is better recognized historically as the original settlement of New York City. This is where the arriving Dutch settlers under Peter Stuyvesant built their homes; Wall Street was the location of an actual defensive wall, constructed across the northern edge of the village. This neighborhood is so old the streets still have names and not numbers on the NYC street grid. The concrete canyons of the Financial District contain...

  • (Manhattan)

    "The Manhattan neighborhood takes it name from one of the world's most recognizable buildings, the wedge-shaped masterpiece designed by Daniel Burnham that dominated the New York City skyline when the early skyscraper was completed in 1902. While the footprint of the building resembles an antique cast-iron clothes iron, the surrounding neighborhood is a compact rectangle centered around Madison Square Park. The blocks north of Union Square, east of Chelsea and west of Gramercy Park weren't even a residential neighborhood until the 1980s when legacy clothing and toy factories began makeovers...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Most New York City neighborhoods contain historic landmarks, in Gramercy Park the neighborhood is the landmark. Early New York developer Samuel Ruggles reclaimed part of a swamp (""Gramercy"" is the mashing up of Dutch words meaning ""little crooked swamp"") to create Manhattan's only private park in 1831. The urban oasis between East 20th and East 21st Streets and Park Avenue and Third Avenue was fenced in a few years later and the four wrought iron gates have been locked since 1844. Once a year, often on the first Sunday in May, the gates of New York's most exclusive private park swing open...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Charming tree-lined, curvy streets and hundred-plus year old townhouses define the west side of West Village. Home to celebrities, mega-millionaires and NYU students West Village is a hub of culture and excitement. West Village is home to plenty of boutiques and cute cafes, giving the quaint area an almost European vibe. Strolls down Bleecker Street or Hudson Street offer great window-shopping! Walk all the way west to the Hudson River, where plenty of public green space is available for exercise or relaxation. Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street is home to the birth of the gay rights mov...

  • (Manhattan)

    "The East Harlem neighborhood has seldom been known by its geographic constraints but always by its ethnicity. The chunk of Manhattan Island at the confluence of the Harlem and East rivers north of 96th Street and east of 5th Avenue spent much of its life as farmland until the arrival of the Lexington Avenue subway after World War I. Italians and Sicilians were the first groups to arrive en masse and the neighborhood was christened Italian Harlem. New York's most famous mayor, Fiorello La Guardia, hailed from East Harlem. The next wave of migration brought Latinos and the neighborhood's more...

  • (Manhattan)

    The plan to create the world's largest performing arts complex was so audacious in 1959 that President Dwight David Eisenhower was summoned from Washington to turn the first shovel of dirt near the intersection of Broadway and 64th Street. In the half-century since ground was broken Lincoln Center has come to embrace 30 indoor and outdoor performance facilities. The neighborhood that grew up around the "great cultural adventure" is compact, embracing the blocks between West 59th and West 72nd streets from the southwest side of Central Park to the Hudson River. This was farmland until the open...

  • (Manhattan)

    A bustling neighborhood by day, this mixed-use area of Manhattan quiets down considerably at night after close of business. Bound by Fifth Avenue and the East River, Midtown East spans from 40th to 59th Streets. Filled with many noteworthy New York architectural marvels such as Grand Central Station, The Chrysler Building and Saint Patrick’s Cathedral, this area is flooded by office workers, shopkeepers, “Mad Men” and corporate types, during the day and a considerably smaller settlement of full-time residents. This section of the city “that never sleeps” is heavily traveled by pro...

  • (Manhattan)

    If you ever wondered why New York City is nicknamed “The City That Never Sleeps”, Midtown West boldly explains everything. Stretching from 5th avenue to the West Side Highway and from 34th street to Central Park South, Midtown West is the largest central business district in the United States. At its heart is Times Square, whose glowing neon signs and Broadway marquees draw tourists and businesspeople like moths to flame. With real estate prices above the Manhattan average, residents consist primarily of a cocktail of young professionals, actors, and multi-generational owners. The gridde...

  • (Manhattan)

    Thinking about living on the Upper East Side of NYC? Framed by Central Park to the west, the East River to the East, and 59th and 96th streets south and north respectively, the Upper East Side (UES) of NYC provides residents and visitors alike with world-class boutiques such as Barneys New York alongside top restaurants and globally recognized museums. The neighborhood’s “Museum Mile” (5th Avenue between East 82nd and 105th streets) features nine renowned museums with favorites such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Museum. Walk a few blocks east and travel up and d...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Culture vultures, runners, therapists and foodies have long been drawn to the family-friendly, tree-lined streets of the Upper West Side (UWS). The neighborhood that stretches from 59th to 110th Street and from Central Park West to the Hudson River offers people with a penchant for pre-war buildings and charming brownstones treasures as varied as the Museum of Natural History, Gray’s Papaya, Lincoln Center, Zabar’s, and the flagship Fairway Market There are multiple dog runs and bike paths in the neighborhood’s parks as well as an array of first-rate restaurants, boutiques, supermark...

  • (Brooklyn)

    If you’re thinking back to old school Brooklyn, Bensonhurst is the place to be. Bensonhurst -- one of the neighborhoods further from Manhattan to still resist gentrification -- is home to clusters of family-owned businesses, local restaurants and generations of Brooklynite residents. The neighborhood is known for having heavy populations of Italian Americans and Jewish Americans as well as a slew of new immigrants, many from Asia, specifically China. Bensonhurst’s borders are slightly controversial, yet you’ll find the neighborhood ending at Bay Parkway and Stillwell Avenue, close to...