Neighborhoods Tagged as: Quiet

Click here to see Blog Posts tagged as: Quiet
  • (Manhattan)

    Battery Park City is its own little narrow enclave, Manhattan’s secret retreat. Coming from the East (your only choice unless you arrive by ferry) you cross West Street – or the West Side Highway –heightening the feeling that you’re kind of leaving the rest of Manhattan behind. Stretching from Chambers Street in the north, to Battery Place in the south, BOC includes a dozen micro-environments, from waterfront parks, sunbathing meadows, ponds, and playgrounds, to restaurants, shopping, movies, and museums. Built on landfill from the first World Trade Center, it’s a neighborhood of...

  • (Manhattan)

    Carnegie Hill is an area in Manhattan’s Upper East Side extending from 86th to 96th Streets, south to north and flanked by Fifth and Third Avenues, west to east. Named for the industrial magnate and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, who built himself an uptown mansion there, Carnegie Hill is indeed hilly, unique and somewhat remote from the noise and frantic pace of the rest of the island. Carnegie Hill divides in character and texture at Lexington Avenue. Moving west along the cool, placid streets lush with shady foliage, you enter a world of timeless privilege and incalculable wealth. F...

  • (Manhattan)

    Manhattan’s Chinatown is a thriving ethnic district, home to many generations of Chinese and Chinese American families as well as plenty of residents without Chinese heritage, but an appreciation for the neighborhood. While Chinatown is bustling in the daytime, most neighborhood establishments close by 9 p.m., fairly early by New York standards, making it a quiet residential area. Chinatown, a warren of little, winding streets, is bounded by Broadway on the West, Rutgers and Essex Streets on the East, Madison and Worth Streets on the South and Broome, Grand and Canal Streets on the North....

  • (Manhattan)

    "Most New York City neighborhoods contain historic landmarks, in Gramercy Park the neighborhood is the landmark. Early New York developer Samuel Ruggles reclaimed part of a swamp (""Gramercy"" is the mashing up of Dutch words meaning ""little crooked swamp"") to create Manhattan's only private park in 1831. The urban oasis between East 20th and East 21st Streets and Park Avenue and Third Avenue was fenced in a few years later and the four wrought iron gates have been locked since 1844. Once a year, often on the first Sunday in May, the gates of New York's most exclusive private park swing open...

  • (Manhattan)

    Once known for its prisons and asylums, Roosevelt Island – an oasis of public parks and river views – provides the feel of suburban living via a five-minute tram ride from Manhattan. Located between Manhattan’s Upper East Side and the borough of Queens, the island attracts a diverse group of people from an ethnic, economic and social standpoint. Young professionals, families, United Nations workers, senior citizens and college students all call Roosevelt Island home. The two-mile long island offers an affordable mix of older low-rise apartment buildings and recently developed high ris...

  • (Manhattan)

    Thinking about living on the Upper East Side of NYC? Framed by Central Park to the west, the East River to the East, and 59th and 96th streets south and north respectively, the Upper East Side (UES) of NYC provides residents and visitors alike with world-class boutiques such as Barneys New York alongside top restaurants and globally recognized museums. The neighborhood’s “Museum Mile” (5th Avenue between East 82nd and 105th streets) features nine renowned museums with favorites such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Museum. Walk a few blocks east and travel up and d...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "Brooklyn Heights is a residential area in Brooklyn, a genteel pocket of affluence, optimism, tranquility and atmosphere – there’s a definite vibe here, and a pleasant one at that. Brooklyn Heights extends from Old Fulton Street and the entrance to the Brooklyn Bridge at the north and flows south to the bustle of Atlantic Avenue. It’s bounded by the East River and Cadman Plaza going west to east. It’s an old and historical place, and was the first neighborhood protected by the local Landmarks Preservation Law. A good deal of the charm of the area comes from the presence of literally hu...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Carroll Gardens is a neighborhood that encompasses a large part of Northern Brooklyn. The boundaries are the Brooklyn Queens Expressway to the east, the Gowanus Expressway to the south, DeGraw street to the north, and the Gowanus Canal to the west. A formerly Italian enclave, the neighborhood has recently gained popularity as a hip place for young people who many have been priced out of nearby Park Slope. One of the draws of Carroll Gardens are the large front gardens many of the beautiful townhouses feature. The neighborhood has many breathtakingly beautiful streets; President Street typifies...

  • (Brooklyn)

    At the very end of Brooklyn, right on the Atlantic Ocean, is a neighborhood perhaps best known for its diversions: Coney Island. Home to a historic boardwalk as well as Luna Park, which opened as New York’s first amusement park in 1903, Coney Island is a prime destination for local tourists during the warmer months. Riding The Cyclone, a large wooden roller coaster often associated with the theme park, is a Brooklyn rite of passage for some, just as eating a Nathan’s hot dog near the boardwalk is for others. In addition to beaches and roller coasters, Coney Island is also a large...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Where in Brooklyn is Greenwood Heights? The boundaries have historically been fluid. Certainly any reckoning would include the blocks adjacent to the namesake Green-Wood Cemetery and that area wedged between the Gowanus Expressway and Prospect Avenue. But when Park Slope got hot in the 1980s many developments here tried to hitch their addresses to the neighbor to the north. These days Greenwood Heights is considered to flow all the way to the waterfront dominated by the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal. The neighborhood is also getting a little juice of its own. Rather than stately brownstones...

  • (Brooklyn)

    How exclusive is Manhattan Beach, the seaside community that has topped recent reports of Brooklyn's priciest neighborhoods? The street names are laid out in alphabetical order and there aren't even enough streets to use up the entire alphabet before Seawall Avenue is reached at the Atlantic Ocean. Manhattan Beach, nestled between Sheepshead Bay to the north, Brighton Beach to the west and the Atlantic Ocean to the south, is only three blocks wide. The median price of homes in Manhattan Beach has nosed northward of one million dollars in a neighborhood that is about as suburban as New York Ci...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Midwood is a Brooklyn neighborhood in the central southern area of the borough. It is bounded on the north by the Brooklyn College campus and on the south by Avenue P. The eastern border is Nostrand Avenue, McDonald Avenue to the west is the other boundary. The ‘hood has seen several demographic changes throughout its history, and most recently the neighborhood has become a destination for Orthodox Jews from other parts of Brooklyn. In fact, the 2012 census found Midwood to be the least diverse neighborhood in otherwise extremely diverse New York! Midwood has remained a steadily quiet and...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Mill Basin is a Brooklyn residential neighborhood on Jamaica Bay. It is bounded by Avenue U to the northwest, and the Mill Basin inlet on all other sides. One of the few neighborhoods in Brooklyn that constitute their own peninsula, Mill Basin was in fact built out by developers in 1906 by dredging up marshland and filling in waterways (Avenue U, in fact, used to just be a creek). The remote location of Mill Basin is reflected in it architecture. The area is composed of almost all single-family houses, with very few condos or co-ops. If you’re searching for a spot to flex your gardening sk...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "Park Slope is The Fertile Crescent of Brooklyn's now decades long ascent to ""most desirable"" borough. This neighborhood trafficked in baby yoga classes, organic greens, and skyrocketing rent, long before the first hipster was a twinkle in Williamsburg's eye. Park Slope is a busy neighborhood with two bustling commercial strips on 5th and 7th avenues--7th Ave being more family oriented where high end children's clothing stores, kid friendly restaurants, and dry cleaners abound. 5th Ave is 7th's single, 30-something sister with boutiques and a plethora of bars and restaurants. The neighborhoo...

  • (Brooklyn)

    It is estimated that more than 11 million people live behind walls in gated communities in the United States. The first place that privilege could be exercised in New York City was Sea Gate. The neighborhood on the eastern tip of Coney Island traces its roots back to a developer named Norton's Point Land Company that bought all the land west of 37th Street on Coney Island in the 1890s. Norton built a casino where the Coney Island Light now stands and sold parcels to people named Vanderbilt and Dodge and Morgan. The social aristocracy enjoyed their summer resort community so much they banded t...