Neighborhoods Tagged as: Restaurants

Click here to see Blog Posts tagged as: Restaurants
  • (Manhattan)

    Home to NYC’s contemporary art scene, Chelsea‘s streets are lined with galleries, studios and trendy apartments. Spanning below 28th Street and above 14th Street, from Broadway to the Hudson River, Chelsea changes character even within its boundaries. To the far west is the High Line, the elevated park that attracts plenty of neighborhood locals as well as tourists. Look towards 23rd street for the prominent Chelsea galleries, like Barbara Gladstone and the Gagosian. Pop into galleries on Thursday evenings for openings that often include free wine and even “meet and greets” with the artists....

  • (Manhattan)

    "The Manhattan neighborhood takes it name from one of the world's most recognizable buildings, the wedge-shaped masterpiece designed by Daniel Burnham that dominated the New York City skyline when the early skyscraper was completed in 1902. While the footprint of the building resembles an antique cast-iron clothes iron, the surrounding neighborhood is a compact rectangle centered around Madison Square Park. The blocks north of Union Square, east of Chelsea and west of Gramercy Park weren't even a residential neighborhood until the 1980s when legacy clothing and toy factories began makeovers...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Most New York City neighborhoods contain historic landmarks, in Gramercy Park the neighborhood is the landmark. Early New York developer Samuel Ruggles reclaimed part of a swamp (""Gramercy"" is the mashing up of Dutch words meaning ""little crooked swamp"") to create Manhattan's only private park in 1831. The urban oasis between East 20th and East 21st Streets and Park Avenue and Third Avenue was fenced in a few years later and the four wrought iron gates have been locked since 1844. Once a year, often on the first Sunday in May, the gates of New York's most exclusive private park swing open...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Charming tree-lined, curvy streets and hundred-plus year old townhouses define the west side of West Village. Home to celebrities, mega-millionaires and NYU students West Village is a hub of culture and excitement. West Village is home to plenty of boutiques and cute cafes, giving the quaint area an almost European vibe. Strolls down Bleecker Street or Hudson Street offer great window-shopping! Walk all the way west to the Hudson River, where plenty of public green space is available for exercise or relaxation. Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street is home to the birth of the gay rights mov...

  • (Manhattan)

    Kips Bay is an interesting area in Manhattan, extending from 23rd Street north to 34th Street and bordering on the Gramercy and Murray Hill sections, respectively. It’s equal parts diverse residential neighborhood and seemingly endless medical complex. Kips Bay’s eastern boundary, extending west to Third Avenue is the mighty East River, where you’ll find Waterside Plaza with it’s vaguely Soviet futuristic architecture and stunning open river views, and the United Nations International School (UNIS), one of the city’s finer and more progressive private schools. First Avenue in Kips Bay is co...

  • (Manhattan)

    "The Lower East Side’s rich immigrant history has made it a truly dynamic place to be for centuries! Currently popular with creatives and young professionals, the Lower East Side (LES) was previously inhabited by Italian immigrants who eventually moved north to Little Italy, Chinese immigrants who moved west to Chinatown and Eastern European Jewish immigrants who moved across the river to Williamsburg. But remnants of these ethnic enclaves are all over the neighborhood. Stretching below Delancey Street and down towards Grand Street, from the East River to Broadway, the Lower East Side...

  • (Manhattan)

    If you ever wondered why New York City is nicknamed “The City That Never Sleeps”, Midtown West boldly explains everything. Stretching from 5th avenue to the West Side Highway and from 34th street to Central Park South, Midtown West is the largest central business district in the United States. At its heart is Times Square, whose glowing neon signs and Broadway marquees draw tourists and businesspeople like moths to flame. With real estate prices above the Manhattan average, residents consist primarily of a cocktail of young professionals, actors, and multi-generational owners. The gridded st...

  • (Manhattan)

    New Yorkers glance at Murray Hill, the swath of Manhattan from 27th to 40th Streets between Fifth Avenue and the East River, as they leave the City via the Midtown Tunnel. Once the home turf of stewardesses, traveling salesman and single career gals working in the Garment Center, sleepy Murray Hill has molted its past, revealing itself to be a liveable and surprisingly lively neighborhood worth a second glance. Old-timers in the neighborhood have been joined by doctors and diplomats, families, and new crop of early career singles. The mix of townhouses, co-ops and high-rise apartments tends...

  • (Manhattan)

    SoHo is an area in Lower Manhattan that is as much a state-of-mind as it is a locale. SoHo is bounded by Houston and Canal streets to the north and south, and by Crosby Street and Avenue of the Americas to the east and west. Most of the streets in central SoHo are rather narrow and paved with Belgian blocks, a sort of half-brick, half cobblestone, and you can go many blocks south, in the shadow of the Freedom Tower, without seeing a tree. It’s an evocative experience, and it’s easy to imagine horses and wagons crowding these streets in another era. SoHo is probably the world’s capital of cas...

  • (Manhattan)

    Less than 50 years ago, TriBeCa, “the triangle below Canal St.,” was an industrial wasteland where starving artists squatted in abandoned warehouses. Today, it’s considered by many to be one of the most desirable neighborhoods in NYC. Stretching from Canal St. (bordering SoHo) south to Vesey St. (abutting the Financial District) and from Broadway west to the Hudson River, Tribeca boasts cobblestoned streets, waterfront views, fabled restaurants, trendy bars and world-class shopping. Its historic warehouses have been painstakingly converted to multi-million-dollar lofts and luxury apartments,...

  • (Manhattan)

    Thinking about living on the Upper East Side of NYC? Framed by Central Park to the west, the East River to the East, and 59th and 96th streets south and north respectively, the Upper East Side (UES) of NYC provides residents and visitors alike with world-class boutiques such as Barneys New York alongside top restaurants and globally recognized museums. The neighborhood’s “Museum Mile” (5th Avenue between East 82nd and 105th streets) features nine renowned museums with favorites such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Museum. Walk a few blocks east and travel up and down th...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Bay Ridge Far in the Southwestern oceanic outskirts of Brooklyn lies Bay Ridge, what many Brooklynites and even Manhattan dwellers are calling the next big neighborhood. Why? Well, partially thanks to low rent prices, as the area is about an hour out of Manhattan. Only accessible by R train, the lack of transportation options is one major drawback to living here. Or, accept the lower rent prices and take more car services. A Business Insider article from June 2014 entitled “NYC Real Estate Has Gotten So Hot That Stockbrokers, Hipsters, And Yuppies Are Invading The Far Reaches Of Brooklyn”...

  • (Brooklyn)

    If you’re thinking back to old school Brooklyn, Bensonhurst is the place to be. Bensonhurst -- one of the neighborhoods further from Manhattan to still resist gentrification -- is home to clusters of family-owned businesses, local restaurants and generations of Brooklynite residents. The neighborhood is known for having heavy populations of Italian Americans and Jewish Americans as well as a slew of new immigrants, many from Asia, specifically China. Bensonhurst’s borders are slightly controversial, yet you’ll find the neighborhood ending at Bay Parkway and Stillwell Avenue, close to the Gr...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "Although the family of Dutch homesteaders, the Boerums, owned most of the land where this neighborhood in northwest Brooklyn existed in colonial times, today, the name ""Boerum Hill"" is more of a marketing slogan than a historical designation. It was created to rebrand North Gowanus when gentrification swept through in the 1970s. The marshland along the Gowanus Creek grew as a working class enclave and, by the end of the 19th century the streets were lined with three-bay, three-story Greek Revival and Italianate brick townhouses set comfortably behind stone stoops. Where once ironworkers re...

  • (Brooklyn)

    One of Brooklyn’s most charming neighborhoods is Cobble Hill! Located close to Boerum Hill and Carroll Gardens, the entire region has gotten the recent nickname of BoCoCa, though the three areas are distinct. Cobble Hill runs from Degraw St. and Atlantic Ave., between Court St. and Hicks St. Though small, the neighborhood is packed with charming brownstones and plenty of attractive boutiques, restaurants and bars. La Vara (www.lavarany.com) is one of Brooklyn’s few Michelin-starred eateries, serving exquisite tapas with Moorish and Jewish influences. Atlantic Avenue’s Colonie serves farm-...