Neighborhoods Tagged as: Shopping

Click here to see Blog Posts tagged as: Shopping
  • (Manhattan)

    Home to NYC’s contemporary art scene, Chelsea‘s streets are lined with galleries, studios and trendy apartments. Spanning below 28th Street and above 14th Street, from Broadway to the Hudson River, Chelsea changes character even within its boundaries. To the far west is the High Line, the elevated park that attracts plenty of neighborhood locals as well as tourists. Look towards 23rd street for the prominent Chelsea galleries, like Barbara Gladstone and the Gagosian. Pop into galleries on Thursday evenings for openings that often include free wine and even “meet and greets” with the...

  • (Manhattan)

    Manhattan’s Chinatown is a thriving ethnic district, home to many generations of Chinese and Chinese American families as well as plenty of residents without Chinese heritage, but an appreciation for the neighborhood. While Chinatown is bustling in the daytime, most neighborhood establishments close by 9 p.m., fairly early by New York standards, making it a quiet residential area. Chinatown, a warren of little, winding streets, is bounded by Broadway on the West, Rutgers and Essex Streets on the East, Madison and Worth Streets on the South and Broome, Grand and Canal Streets on the North....

  • (Manhattan)

    "The Manhattan neighborhood takes it name from one of the world's most recognizable buildings, the wedge-shaped masterpiece designed by Daniel Burnham that dominated the New York City skyline when the early skyscraper was completed in 1902. While the footprint of the building resembles an antique cast-iron clothes iron, the surrounding neighborhood is a compact rectangle centered around Madison Square Park. The blocks north of Union Square, east of Chelsea and west of Gramercy Park weren't even a residential neighborhood until the 1980s when legacy clothing and toy factories began makeovers...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Charming tree-lined, curvy streets and hundred-plus year old townhouses define the west side of West Village. Home to celebrities, mega-millionaires and NYU students West Village is a hub of culture and excitement. West Village is home to plenty of boutiques and cute cafes, giving the quaint area an almost European vibe. Strolls down Bleecker Street or Hudson Street offer great window-shopping! Walk all the way west to the Hudson River, where plenty of public green space is available for exercise or relaxation. Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street is home to the birth of the gay rights mov...

  • (Manhattan)

    A bustling neighborhood by day, this mixed-use area of Manhattan quiets down considerably at night after close of business. Bound by Fifth Avenue and the East River, Midtown East spans from 40th to 59th Streets. Filled with many noteworthy New York architectural marvels such as Grand Central Station, The Chrysler Building and Saint Patrick’s Cathedral, this area is flooded by office workers, shopkeepers, “Mad Men” and corporate types, during the day and a considerably smaller settlement of full-time residents. This section of the city “that never sleeps” is heavily traveled by pro...

  • (Manhattan)

    SoHo is an area in Lower Manhattan that is as much a state-of-mind as it is a locale. SoHo is bounded by Houston and Canal streets to the north and south, and by Crosby Street and Avenue of the Americas to the east and west. Most of the streets in central SoHo are rather narrow and paved with Belgian blocks, a sort of half-brick, half cobblestone, and you can go many blocks south, in the shadow of the Freedom Tower, without seeing a tree. It’s an evocative experience, and it’s easy to imagine horses and wagons crowding these streets in another era. SoHo is probably the world’s capital...

  • (Manhattan)

    Less than 50 years ago, TriBeCa, “the triangle below Canal St.,” was an industrial wasteland where starving artists squatted in abandoned warehouses. Today, it’s considered by many to be one of the most desirable neighborhoods in NYC. Stretching from Canal St. (bordering SoHo) south to Vesey St. (abutting the Financial District) and from Broadway west to the Hudson River, Tribeca boasts cobblestoned streets, waterfront views, fabled restaurants, trendy bars and world-class shopping. Its historic warehouses have been painstakingly converted to multi-million-dollar lofts and luxury apart...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "Although the family of Dutch homesteaders, the Boerums, owned most of the land where this neighborhood in northwest Brooklyn existed in colonial times, today, the name ""Boerum Hill"" is more of a marketing slogan than a historical designation. It was created to rebrand North Gowanus when gentrification swept through in the 1970s. The marshland along the Gowanus Creek grew as a working class enclave and, by the end of the 19th century the streets were lined with three-bay, three-story Greek Revival and Italianate brick townhouses set comfortably behind stone stoops. Where once ironworkers re...

  • (Brooklyn)

    One of Brooklyn’s most charming neighborhoods is Cobble Hill! Located close to Boerum Hill and Carroll Gardens, the entire region has gotten the recent nickname of BoCoCa, though the three areas are distinct. Cobble Hill runs from Degraw St. and Atlantic Ave., between Court St. and Hicks St. Though small, the neighborhood is packed with charming brownstones and plenty of attractive boutiques, restaurants and bars. La Vara (www.lavarany.com) is one of Brooklyn’s few Michelin-starred eateries, serving exquisite tapas with Moorish and Jewish influences. Atlantic Avenue’s Colonie serves...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Downtown Brooklyn is a neighborhood in transition. Currently home to just over 7,000 residents, recent construction has brought thousands more living units into the area, which is predicted to grow rapidly in the coming years. Bordering Brooklyn Heights and DUMBO, this central district is close enough to the waterfront to appreciate the Brooklyn Bridge yet also packed with attractions to lure neighbors into the area. Adams St. and Jay St. are the main thoroughfares, with plenty of restaurants and shopping. The Brooklyn Courthouse and the adjacent Cadman Plaza is a main destination, with s...

  • (Queens)

    College Point is a mixed residential/industrial neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It is located north of Flushing on Flushing Bay and the East River and is part of the Queens Community Board 7. Willets Point Boulevard and the Whitestone Expressway are often the neighborhood's approximate boundaries with Flushing and Whitestone. The 109th precinct NYPD serves College Point.

  • (Bronx)

    The Grand Concourse is a prominent thoroughfare bisecting the heart of the Bronx, extending north from East 138th street to Mosholu Parkway and nearby Van Cortlandt Park. It has great accessibility to Manhattan, served by a plethora of subway lines, with Grand Central 25 minutes away. The neighborhood includes the Grand Concourse Historical District, a living museum of stunning and remarkably preserved apartment buildings and houses in the Art Deco, Art Moderne and Tudor styles, landmarked for posterity and extending from 153rd to 167th streets. The magic continues well past the historic dis...

  • (Bronx)

    For decades a middle-class neighborhood made up largely of Jewish and Irish families, Fordham has become thoroughly diverse and a well-traversed area of the Bronx. It is home to large numbers of middle and working class families in the range of approximately 80,000 people. Fordham’s boundaries are difficult to outline, but they begin approximately near Fordham Road in the north, Jerome Avenue on the west, down to East 161st in the south, and Southern Boulevard in the east. Fordham is a town of rich, evolving history. Titled Old Fordham Village in the 18th century, the King’s road cut thro...

  • (Bronx)

    Richard Morris, a Captain in the British Parliamentary Army, sailed from Barbados in 1670 to buy this land on the east bank of the Harlem River for himself and his brother, Lewis. Before the Manor of Morrisania was sold off nearly two centuries later the family would produce a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a United States Senator and a mayor of New York City. While the Morris name has faded from public consciousness, a more recent arrival from the Caribbean made history in the neighborhood that continues to resonate with Morris Heights’ residents today. Jamaican immigrant Clive...

  • (Bronx)

    Head north in the Bronx on the 4 train to the last stop and you will arrive in Woodlawn. Nicknamed Little Ireland by locals, this quaint residential neighborhood of 8,000 in the northern section of the Bronx affords a little taste of suburbia within the city. Rows of single-family homes and low-rise apartment complexes fill the neighborhood and lend to a family-friendly area. Katonah Avenue, the major north-south artery though Woodlawn, is lined with shops, bars and restaurants. Most noteworthy is the selection of Irish bars and restaurants such as Celtic House and Mary’s Celtic Kitchen. Woo...