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  • (Manhattan)

    Alphabet City, or Loisaida as it was named by a generation of Puerto Rican emigrants, is a Manhattan neighborhood that offers generous atmospheric doses of both the Lower East Side and the East Village. Picture being within a block of the Hudson, 5 seconds away from the bike path that can take you up, down and around NYC. Picture being in your own little corner of Manhattan, with grassy parks, big skies and not one, not two, but three Danny Meyer restaurants a quick walk away. It’s an area that extends from 14th Street bordering on Peter Cooper Village and Stuyvesant Town to the north, with...

  • (Manhattan)

    Home to NYC’s contemporary art scene, Chelsea‘s streets are lined with galleries, studios and trendy apartments. Spanning below 28th Street and above 14th Street, from Broadway to the Hudson River, Chelsea changes character even within its boundaries. To the far west is the High Line, the elevated park that attracts plenty of neighborhood locals as well as tourists. Look towards 23rd street for the prominent Chelsea galleries, like Barbara Gladstone and the Gagosian. Pop into galleries on Thursday evenings for openings that often include free wine and even “meet and greets” with the artists....

  • (Manhattan)

    "Known as a physical extension of the NYU campus, the East Village has transformed from its once-gritty reputation into a cleaner, more hip (and gentrified), lively neighborhood where the action never stops. Twenty-somethings are the dominant group of residents, but the neighborhood has its breadth of diversity, like any area of New York City. Bordered below 14th Street, above Houston Street, and anything east of Broadway, even within the boundaries of the East Village you’ll find various subcultures and pockets of culture. Avenues A, B, C, and D are known as Alphabet City, a once popula...

  • (Manhattan)

    "The Manhattan neighborhood takes it name from one of the world's most recognizable buildings, the wedge-shaped masterpiece designed by Daniel Burnham that dominated the New York City skyline when the early skyscraper was completed in 1902. While the footprint of the building resembles an antique cast-iron clothes iron, the surrounding neighborhood is a compact rectangle centered around Madison Square Park. The blocks north of Union Square, east of Chelsea and west of Gramercy Park weren't even a residential neighborhood until the 1980s when legacy clothing and toy factories began makeovers...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Charming tree-lined, curvy streets and hundred-plus year old townhouses define the west side of West Village. Home to celebrities, mega-millionaires and NYU students West Village is a hub of culture and excitement. West Village is home to plenty of boutiques and cute cafes, giving the quaint area an almost European vibe. Strolls down Bleecker Street or Hudson Street offer great window-shopping! Walk all the way west to the Hudson River, where plenty of public green space is available for exercise or relaxation. Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street is home to the birth of the gay rights mov...

  • (Manhattan)

    "The Lower East Side’s rich immigrant history has made it a truly dynamic place to be for centuries! Currently popular with creatives and young professionals, the Lower East Side (LES) was previously inhabited by Italian immigrants who eventually moved north to Little Italy, Chinese immigrants who moved west to Chinatown and Eastern European Jewish immigrants who moved across the river to Williamsburg. But remnants of these ethnic enclaves are all over the neighborhood. Stretching below Delancey Street and down towards Grand Street, from the East River to Broadway, the Lower East Side...

  • (Manhattan)

    SoHo is an area in Lower Manhattan that is as much a state-of-mind as it is a locale. SoHo is bounded by Houston and Canal streets to the north and south, and by Crosby Street and Avenue of the Americas to the east and west. Most of the streets in central SoHo are rather narrow and paved with Belgian blocks, a sort of half-brick, half cobblestone, and you can go many blocks south, in the shadow of the Freedom Tower, without seeing a tree. It’s an evocative experience, and it’s easy to imagine horses and wagons crowding these streets in another era. SoHo is probably the world’s capital of cas...

  • (Manhattan)

    Less than 50 years ago, TriBeCa, “the triangle below Canal St.,” was an industrial wasteland where starving artists squatted in abandoned warehouses. Today, it’s considered by many to be one of the most desirable neighborhoods in NYC. Stretching from Canal St. (bordering SoHo) south to Vesey St. (abutting the Financial District) and from Broadway west to the Hudson River, Tribeca boasts cobblestoned streets, waterfront views, fabled restaurants, trendy bars and world-class shopping. Its historic warehouses have been painstakingly converted to multi-million-dollar lofts and luxury apartments,...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Bedford-Stuyvesant is a central Brooklyn neighborhood with a rich history and a lot of character. Recent years have brought a huge influx of gentrification to the area, which many blame on rising Manhattan rents forcing middle class New Yorkers to move to neighborhoods previously deemed less desirable. A predominantly African American neighborhood, the surge of “yuppies” moving into the neighborhood has been criticized by many who want to retain Bed-Stuy’s identity. Bed-Stuy stretches from Flushing Avene on the north (bordering Williamsburg) to Classon Avenue on the west (Clinton Hill)...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "If one definition of a neighborhood ""arriving"" is its discovery by national chain stores, Bushwick is still decidedly in the ""up and coming"" camp. Bushwick was its own independent town for 200 years before casting its lot with Brooklyn in 1854. The town was cleaved into the neighborhoods of Williamsburg, Greenpoint and Bushwick. So many Germans settled here in the 1800s that the brewing industry was the economic foundation of the community. In 1904 44 breweries were keeping the borough awash in Bavarian Pilsner beer. In those days, Bushwick was a working class neighborhood with spotles...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Gowanus retains its gritty, industrial feel, despite the recent influx of residential and community ­oriented development. The neighborhood comprises the areas surrounded by its namesake canal, bordered by the Brooklyn­ Queens Expressway and Baltic Street north and south, and then 4th Avenue and Hoyt Street from the east and west. Gowanus’ history of industry has led to a deeply toxic canal, but the residents are forging ahead, aiming to create the area as a sort of “urban utopia.” Recent development includes, most notably, a superlative Whole Foods that features solar panels, windmills and a...

  • (Brooklyn)

    "Just at the tip of North Brooklyn rests a small neighborhood called Greenpoint. Accessible only by G-train stops at Nassau Avenue and Bedford or Manhattan Avenue and Greenpoint Avenue, the East River Ferry, or the B62 or B43 bus, the relative inaccessibility of this neighborhood is what makes it so charming. Home to generations of Polish immigrants, Manhattan Ave is full of pierogi restaurants and small businesses owned by generations of Polish Brooklynites. The area has not yet been as commercialized as its neighbor, Williamsburg – separated via MacCarren Park – and has become a pop...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Sunset Park is a neighborhood located in Southern Brooklyn, bounded by Park Slope and Greenwood Heights to the north, Borough Park to the east, Bay Ridge to the south, and Upper New York Bay to the west. Sunset Park has been a safe haven for families for decades, beginning in the 1800’s, when the waterfront of this neighborhood was a bustling business district that attracted Scandinavian immigrants. As the years passed, Sunset Park saw influxes of Irish, Puerto Rican and Polish arrivals. The neighborhood has maintained a vibrant personality with about 50 percent of the population born outside...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Notable home to Hasids (South Williamsburg) and Hipsters (North Williamsburg), i.e. Orthodox Jews and “alternative” twenty-somethings, Williamsburg has also seen a ton of changes in recent years. 2014 brought an Urban Outfitters, J.Crew and Starbucks to the neighborhood, and an Apple store and Whole Foods are both rumored to be moving in soon. While many local businesses have been forced to close due to this infiltration, plenty of Williamsburg classics are still standing strong. Walk down Bedford Avenue, from North 12th St all the way to South 7th and you’ll see independent bakeries...

  • (Manhattan)

    Need a guide for living in Greenwich Village, NYC?Charming tree-lined streets and hundred-plus year old townhouses define NYC's Greenwich Village. Home to celebrities, mega-millionaires and NYU students, Greenwich Village is a hub of culture and excitement. Greenwich Village is home to plenty of boutiques and cafes, giving the quaint area an almost European vibe. Strolls down Bleecker Street or Hudson Street offer great window-shopping! Walk all the way west to the Hudson River, where plenty of public green space is available for exercise or relaxation. Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street...