Neighborhoods Tagged as: Young Professional

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  • (Manhattan)

    Alphabet City, or Loisaida as it was named by a generation of Puerto Rican emigrants, is a Manhattan neighborhood that offers generous atmospheric doses of both the Lower East Side and the East Village. Picture being within a block of the Hudson, 5 seconds away from the bike path that can take you up, down and around NYC. Picture being in your own little corner of Manhattan, with grassy parks, big skies and not one, not two, but three Danny Meyer restaurants a quick walk away. It’s an area that extends from 14th Street bordering on Peter Cooper Village and Stuyvesant Town to the north, wi...

  • (Manhattan)

    Battery Park City is its own little narrow enclave, Manhattan’s secret retreat. Coming from the East (your only choice unless you arrive by ferry) you cross West Street – or the West Side Highway –heightening the feeling that you’re kind of leaving the rest of Manhattan behind. Stretching from Chambers Street in the north, to Battery Place in the south, BOC includes a dozen micro-environments, from waterfront parks, sunbathing meadows, ponds, and playgrounds, to restaurants, shopping, movies, and museums. Built on landfill from the first World Trade Center, it’s a neighborhood of...

  • (Manhattan)

    Home to NYC’s contemporary art scene, Chelsea‘s streets are lined with galleries, studios and trendy apartments. Spanning below 28th Street and above 14th Street, from Broadway to the Hudson River, Chelsea changes character even within its boundaries. To the far west is the High Line, the elevated park that attracts plenty of neighborhood locals as well as tourists. Look towards 23rd street for the prominent Chelsea galleries, like Barbara Gladstone and the Gagosian. Pop into galleries on Thursday evenings for openings that often include free wine and even “meet and greets” with the...

  • (Manhattan)

    "Known as a physical extension of the NYU campus, the East Village has transformed from its once-gritty reputation into a cleaner, more hip (and gentrified), lively neighborhood where the action never stops. Twenty-somethings are the dominant group of residents, but the neighborhood has its breadth of diversity, like any area of New York City. Bordered below 14th Street, above Houston Street, and anything east of Broadway, even within the boundaries of the East Village you’ll find various subcultures and pockets of culture. Avenues A, B, C, and D are known as Alphabet City, a once popu...

  • (Manhattan)

    Although the Financial District of NYC is immediately associated with Wall Street, the stock market and investment bankers, the neighborhood at the southern tip of Manhattan is better recognized historically as the original settlement of New York City. This is where the arriving Dutch settlers under Peter Stuyvesant built their homes; Wall Street was the location of an actual defensive wall, constructed across the northern edge of the village. This neighborhood is so old the streets still have names and not numbers on the NYC street grid. The concrete canyons of the Financial District contain...

  • (Manhattan)

    "The Manhattan neighborhood takes it name from one of the world's most recognizable buildings, the wedge-shaped masterpiece designed by Daniel Burnham that dominated the New York City skyline when the early skyscraper was completed in 1902. While the footprint of the building resembles an antique cast-iron clothes iron, the surrounding neighborhood is a compact rectangle centered around Madison Square Park. The blocks north of Union Square, east of Chelsea and west of Gramercy Park weren't even a residential neighborhood until the 1980s when legacy clothing and toy factories began makeovers...

  • (Manhattan)

    Kips Bay is an interesting area in Manhattan, extending from 23rd Street north to 34th Street and bordering on the Gramercy and Murray Hill sections, respectively. It’s equal parts diverse residential neighborhood and seemingly endless medical complex. Kips Bay’s eastern boundary, extending west to Third Avenue is the mighty East River, where you’ll find Waterside Plaza with it’s vaguely Soviet futuristic architecture and stunning open river views, and the United Nations International School (UNIS), one of the city’s finer and more progressive private schools. First Avenue in Kips...

  • (Manhattan)

    New Yorkers glance at Murray Hill, the swath of Manhattan from 27th to 40th Streets between Fifth Avenue and the East River, as they leave the City via the Midtown Tunnel. Once the home turf of stewardesses, traveling salesman and single career gals working in the Garment Center, sleepy Murray Hill has molted its past, revealing itself to be a liveable and surprisingly lively neighborhood worth a second glance. Old-timers in the neighborhood have been joined by doctors and diplomats, families, and new crop of early career singles. The mix of townhouses, co-ops and high-rise apartments tends...

  • (Manhattan)

    Once known for its prisons and asylums, Roosevelt Island – an oasis of public parks and river views – provides the feel of suburban living via a five-minute tram ride from Manhattan. Located between Manhattan’s Upper East Side and the borough of Queens, the island attracts a diverse group of people from an ethnic, economic and social standpoint. Young professionals, families, United Nations workers, senior citizens and college students all call Roosevelt Island home. The two-mile long island offers an affordable mix of older low-rise apartment buildings and recently developed high ris...

  • (Manhattan)

    SoHo is an area in Lower Manhattan that is as much a state-of-mind as it is a locale. SoHo is bounded by Houston and Canal streets to the north and south, and by Crosby Street and Avenue of the Americas to the east and west. Most of the streets in central SoHo are rather narrow and paved with Belgian blocks, a sort of half-brick, half cobblestone, and you can go many blocks south, in the shadow of the Freedom Tower, without seeing a tree. It’s an evocative experience, and it’s easy to imagine horses and wagons crowding these streets in another era. SoHo is probably the world’s capital...

  • (Manhattan)

    "One of the most affordable areas of New York City is also one of its highest physical points. Flanked by the Hudson and Harlem Rivers, Washington Heights (‘The Heights’) begins at west 155th and stretches up to Dykman Street. A bustling terraced town of 5ish story apartment buildings, house rows, and co-ops that inspired the Broadway show In the Heights, Washington Heights breathes gentrification in motion. The Spanish-infused lyrics and rocking salsa/hip-hop score of the show invokes the bilingual nature of its immigrant population, with splashes accommodating the rich reality of ethnic...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Downtown Brooklyn is a neighborhood in transition. Currently home to just over 7,000 residents, recent construction has brought thousands more living units into the area, which is predicted to grow rapidly in the coming years. Bordering Brooklyn Heights and DUMBO, this central district is close enough to the waterfront to appreciate the Brooklyn Bridge yet also packed with attractions to lure neighbors into the area. Adams St. and Jay St. are the main thoroughfares, with plenty of restaurants and shopping. The Brooklyn Courthouse and the adjacent Cadman Plaza is a main destination, with s...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Prospect Park South/Kensington is an affordable choice for those who want to live steps from Brooklyn’s finest public park. Located just south of the Prospect Park parade grounds, the neighborhood extends south to Beverley Road, and is bounded by Ocean Avenue and Coney Island Avenue. The area is safe and mainly populated by families, making it ideal for those looking to settle down or enjoy a quieter side of New York life. Searching for a garage and yard? As designated by New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission, the neighborhood is a historic district, and Victorian beauties line man...

  • (Brooklyn)

    One of the most difficult to reach areas in Brooklyn is also the most worthwhile to visit! Take the ferry from Lower Manhattan or prepare for a long walk or bus ride from the G or F trains to arrive at this quaint Brooklyn neighborhood that’s reminiscent of a seaside fishing village. A neighborhood since the 1600s, Red Hook remains a lively community! Cobblestone streets, a shipyard welcoming cargo and cruise ships from across the Atlantic, and adorable old buildings and homes make up most of Red Hook. Red Hook has recently become a destination for food lovers! Chef Andy Ricker brought hi...

  • (Brooklyn)

    Sunset Park is a neighborhood located in Southern Brooklyn, bounded by Park Slope and Greenwood Heights to the north, Borough Park to the east, Bay Ridge to the south, and Upper New York Bay to the west. Sunset Park has been a safe haven for families for decades, beginning in the 1800’s, when the waterfront of this neighborhood was a bustling business district that attracted Scandinavian immigrants. As the years passed, Sunset Park saw influxes of Irish, Puerto Rican and Polish arrivals. The neighborhood has maintained a vibrant personality with about 50 percent of the population born outsid...